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IVE SEEN A GOLDEN TORTOISE BEETLE IN ARKI!

IVE SEEN A GOLDEN TORTOISE BEETLE IN ARKI!

(Source: allesthesia, via molluscamanifesto)

Tags: #cute #insect #beetle #glowing #animals #facts
rhamphotheca:

The white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) is a large bird of prey in the family Accipitridae, found in Europe and northern Asia. Measuring 66–94 cm (26–37 in) in length, the species 1.78–2.45 m (5.8–8.0 ft) wingspan is on average the largest of any eagle. Although they often scavenge, the eagles may also hunt prey such as fish, birds and mammals.
 Photograph by Yathin S Krishnappa
(via: Wikipedia)

rhamphotheca:

The white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) is a large bird of prey in the family Accipitridae, found in Europe and northern Asia. Measuring 66–94 cm (26–37 in) in length, the species 1.78–2.45 m (5.8–8.0 ft) wingspan is on average the largest of any eagle. Although they often scavenge, the eagles may also hunt prey such as fish, birds and mammals.

Photograph by Yathin S Krishnappa

(via: Wikipedia)

Posted 1 week ago with 88 notes
rhamphotheca:

The yellow mongoose (Cynictis penicillata) is a small mammal, in the  Carnivoran family Herpestidae, averaging about 1 lb (1/2 kg) in weight and about 20 in (500 mm) in length. Found in southern Africa, it lives in flat areas ranging from semi-desert scrubland to grasslands. This carnivorous species lives in colonies of up to 20 individuals.
 Photograph: Yathin S Krishnappa
(via: Wikipedia)

rhamphotheca:

The yellow mongoose (Cynictis penicillata) is a small mammal, in the  Carnivoran family Herpestidae, averaging about 1 lb (1/2 kg) in weight and about 20 in (500 mm) in length. Found in southern Africa, it lives in flat areas ranging from semi-desert scrubland to grasslands. This carnivorous species lives in colonies of up to 20 individuals.

Photograph: Yathin S Krishnappa

(via: Wikipedia)

Tags: #mongoose #carnivore #mammals #animals #facts
Posted 1 week ago with 210 notes
Posted 1 week ago with 502 notes
Posted 1 week ago with 2 notes
rhamphotheca:

Bizarre, Prehistoric Ratfish Chomped Prey with Buzzsaw Jaws
by Brian Switek 
Helicoprion had saws for jaws. That’s really all there was to the 270 million year old ratfish’s dental cutlery. No upper teeth or anything else to slice against – just an ever-growing whorl of spiky teeth anchored to the lower jaw.
This new, definitive image of Helicoprion debuted last year thanks to the efforts of artist Ray Troll and a team of researchers led by Idaho State University paleontologist Leif Tapanila. A very special fossil – IMNH 37899 – preserved both the upper and lower jaws in a closed position, finally solving the mystery of what the ratfish’s head actually looked like. But determining the exact placement of that vexing spiral was just an initial step.
Paleontologists and artists had often supposed that Helicoprion had upper teeth to pierce slippery cephalopods and squirming fish, but the fossils Tapanila and colleagues examined showed that Helicoprion only had a buzzsaw embedded in the lower jaw. How did this long-lived and prolific genus of Permian fish eat with a saw for a jaw? …
(read more: Laelaps blog - National Geographic)
photograph by Brian Switek

rhamphotheca:

Bizarre, Prehistoric Ratfish Chomped Prey with Buzzsaw Jaws

by Brian Switek 

Helicoprion had saws for jaws. That’s really all there was to the 270 million year old ratfish’s dental cutlery. No upper teeth or anything else to slice against – just an ever-growing whorl of spiky teeth anchored to the lower jaw.

This new, definitive image of Helicoprion debuted last year thanks to the efforts of artist Ray Troll and a team of researchers led by Idaho State University paleontologist Leif Tapanila. A very special fossil – IMNH 37899 – preserved both the upper and lower jaws in a closed position, finally solving the mystery of what the ratfish’s head actually looked like. But determining the exact placement of that vexing spiral was just an initial step.

Paleontologists and artists had often supposed that Helicoprion had upper teeth to pierce slippery cephalopods and squirming fish, but the fossils Tapanila and colleagues examined showed that Helicoprion only had a buzzsaw embedded in the lower jaw. How did this long-lived and prolific genus of Permian fish eat with a saw for a jaw? …

(read more: Laelaps blog - National Geographic)

photograph by Brian Switek

Posted 1 week ago with 462 notes
iyacarolina:

Western Ribbon Snake because my friend asked for a black and gold snake and then I found this

iyacarolina:

Western Ribbon Snake because my friend asked for a black and gold snake and then I found this

Posted 2 weeks ago with 1 note
libutron:

Pyrosome - colonial salp
What you see in the photo is not a single organism, but a colony of tunicates of the genus Pyrosoma.
Colonies of pyrosomes may reach a length of 60 cm and forms a distinctive rigid tube that may be colorless, pink, grayish or blue-green. One end is closed and tapered, with the opposing open end having a diaphragm.  The tube has a rough texture due to papillae on the individuals making up the colony. 
Unlike salps that use pulsing of the body wall to pump water, pyrosomes depend on cilia to move water through the body.
Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent. In fact, the genus name Pyrosoma is derived from the Greek, pyros (fire) and soma (body), referring to the bright bioluminescence characteristic of this group.   
[Animalia - Chordata - Tunicata - Thaliacea - Pyrosomida - Pyrosomatidae - Pyrosoma] 
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Nick Hobgood | Locality: Atauro Island Dili, East Timor

libutron:

Pyrosome - colonial salp

What you see in the photo is not a single organism, but a colony of tunicates of the genus Pyrosoma.

Colonies of pyrosomes may reach a length of 60 cm and forms a distinctive rigid tube that may be colorless, pink, grayish or blue-green. One end is closed and tapered, with the opposing open end having a diaphragm.  The tube has a rough texture due to papillae on the individuals making up the colony. 

Unlike salps that use pulsing of the body wall to pump water, pyrosomes depend on cilia to move water through the body.

Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent. In fact, the genus name Pyrosoma is derived from the Greek, pyros (fire) and soma (body), referring to the bright bioluminescence characteristic of this group.   

[Animalia - Chordata - Tunicata - Thaliacea - Pyrosomida - Pyrosomatidae - Pyrosoma

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Nick Hobgood | Locality: Atauro Island Dili, East Timor

(via molluscamanifesto)