A N I M A L S : )
iyacarolina:

Western Ribbon Snake because my friend asked for a black and gold snake and then I found this

iyacarolina:

Western Ribbon Snake because my friend asked for a black and gold snake and then I found this

Posted 1 day ago with 1 note
libutron:

Pyrosome - colonial salp
What you see in the photo is not a single organism, but a colony of tunicates of the genus Pyrosoma.
Colonies of pyrosomes may reach a length of 60 cm and forms a distinctive rigid tube that may be colorless, pink, grayish or blue-green. One end is closed and tapered, with the opposing open end having a diaphragm.  The tube has a rough texture due to papillae on the individuals making up the colony. 
Unlike salps that use pulsing of the body wall to pump water, pyrosomes depend on cilia to move water through the body.
Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent. In fact, the genus name Pyrosoma is derived from the Greek, pyros (fire) and soma (body), referring to the bright bioluminescence characteristic of this group.   
[Animalia - Chordata - Tunicata - Thaliacea - Pyrosomida - Pyrosomatidae - Pyrosoma] 
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Nick Hobgood | Locality: Atauro Island Dili, East Timor

libutron:

Pyrosome - colonial salp

What you see in the photo is not a single organism, but a colony of tunicates of the genus Pyrosoma.

Colonies of pyrosomes may reach a length of 60 cm and forms a distinctive rigid tube that may be colorless, pink, grayish or blue-green. One end is closed and tapered, with the opposing open end having a diaphragm.  The tube has a rough texture due to papillae on the individuals making up the colony. 

Unlike salps that use pulsing of the body wall to pump water, pyrosomes depend on cilia to move water through the body.

Pyrosomes are brightly bioluminescent. In fact, the genus name Pyrosoma is derived from the Greek, pyros (fire) and soma (body), referring to the bright bioluminescence characteristic of this group.   

[Animalia - Chordata - Tunicata - Thaliacea - Pyrosomida - Pyrosomatidae - Pyrosoma

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Nick Hobgood | Locality: Atauro Island Dili, East Timor

(via molluscamanifesto)

Posted 1 week ago with 216 notes
Posted 1 week ago with 569 notes
NEW TARSIER SPECIES DISCOVERED: DINAGAT TIRAGA TARSIERMANILA, Philippines – International biologists have confirmed the discovery of a new species of Tarsier on the island of Dinagat in Mindanao 25 years after a Filipino biologist first saw the possibility of there being a distinct species.Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/631002/new-species-of-tarsier-discovered-in-dinagat-island#ixzz3B1aT1lL6 Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

NEW TARSIER SPECIES DISCOVERED: DINAGAT TIRAGA TARSIER

MANILA, Philippines – International biologists have confirmed the discovery of a new species of Tarsier on the island of Dinagat in Mindanao 25 years after a Filipino biologist first saw the possibility of there being a distinct species.


Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/631002/new-species-of-tarsier-discovered-in-dinagat-island#ixzz3B1aT1lL6 
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

Tags: #news #animals #biology #philippines #bohol #tarsier #primate #cute #pygmy #facts #mammals #small monkey #big eyes #discovery
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The Mako Shark, also called Isurus in the scientific community, is an incredible and extremely fast beast. Today, there are only two living species of Mako remaining. They are called the Longfin Makos and the Shortfin Makos. The largest is the Longfin with a length of about 4.5 meters (14ft) and adults weigh in around 170 kilograms (375 pounds). Shortfin sharks are usually about half this size and weight. Both species are easily identified due to their strange (and mean looking) teeth. These teeth are visible even when their mouths are closed. For simple identification, the Mako tends to look like a smaller version of the Great White Shark.

Read more about the Mako Shark

From www.sharksider.com

The Mako Shark, also called Isurus in the scientific community, is an incredible and extremely fast beast. Today, there are only two living species of Mako remaining. They are called the Longfin Makos and the Shortfin Makos. The largest is the Longfin with a length of about 4.5 meters (14ft) and adults weigh in around 170 kilograms (375 pounds). Shortfin sharks are usually about half this size and weight. Both species are easily identified due to their strange (and mean looking) teeth. These teeth are visible even when their mouths are closed. For simple identification, the Mako tends to look like a smaller version of the Great White Shark.

Read more about the Mako Shark

From www.sharksider.com

Tags: #mako #shark #shark week #one shark a day #cute #endangered species #blue #marine #ocean #water #wild life #facts #animals
Posted 2 weeks ago with 0 notes
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