A N I M A L S : )

Siphonopore or Siphonoporae is a distant relative of jellyfish and belongs to the zooids family, but whose components are much more complex and interesting.

For starters, these species is not just one organism but a colony of different other organisms known as zooids, connected together and become one large specimen. Zooids are specialized organism; in fact, they seemed that they cannot survive on their own.

That’s why they need to be integrated with others and become siphonopore and work together to eat, move and breathe.

The clip below was captured in June by Rebecca Helm, a marine biologist and part of Nautilus Live Team Expedition. The group is headed by Dr. Thomas Ballard, the same man who discovered the famed Titanic’s wreckage.

Nautilus Live is broadcasting online from the depths of the ocean to give its audience a glimpse and experience of the underwater expedition and the wonders of marine life.

Writing on her blog Deep Sea News, Helm described the creature she captured on camera as “simply stunning,” and “something much more rare and mysterious than any sunken ship”.

According to Helm, she had seen quite a number of siphonopore before; some of them are colored red or orange, but never ever a purple-blue like the one she just found.

Apparently creatures like siphonopore are very rare and can mostly be found at the deepest part of the ocean. Helm said, they often travelled alone and never by group, making any discovery as just a matter of luck.

“That being said, some expeditions are very lucky. Until then, I’m happy to sit back and enjoy the beautiful show,” she said.

Watch the video below, and although some of us may not be interested in science or strange marine life, the creature siphonopore is quite mesmerizing, nonetheless (Video Credit:EVNautilus).

(Source: kickerdaily.com)

Posted 1 month ago with 0 notes
libutron:

Neotropical Rattlesnake - Crotalus durissus 
Crotalus durissus (Viperidae) is a neotropical species of rattlesnake with several subspecies along its range; all of them are venomous.
Other common names: Cascabel Rattlesnake, South American Rattlesnake, Yucatan Rattlesnake
References: [1]
Photo credit: ©Thierry Montford | Locality: French Guiana (2014)

libutron:

Neotropical Rattlesnake - Crotalus durissus 

Crotalus durissus (Viperidae) is a neotropical species of rattlesnake with several subspecies along its range; all of them are venomous.

Other common names: Cascabel Rattlesnake, South American Rattlesnake, Yucatan Rattlesnake

References: [1]

Photo credit: ©Thierry Montford | Locality: French Guiana (2014)

(via molluscamanifesto)

Tags: #reptile #viper #rattlesnake #snake #animals #facts #cute
IVE SEEN A GOLDEN TORTOISE BEETLE IN ARKI!

IVE SEEN A GOLDEN TORTOISE BEETLE IN ARKI!

(Source: allesthesia, via molluscamanifesto)

Tags: #cute #insect #beetle #glowing #animals #facts
rhamphotheca:

The white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) is a large bird of prey in the family Accipitridae, found in Europe and northern Asia. Measuring 66–94 cm (26–37 in) in length, the species 1.78–2.45 m (5.8–8.0 ft) wingspan is on average the largest of any eagle. Although they often scavenge, the eagles may also hunt prey such as fish, birds and mammals.
 Photograph by Yathin S Krishnappa
(via: Wikipedia)

rhamphotheca:

The white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) is a large bird of prey in the family Accipitridae, found in Europe and northern Asia. Measuring 66–94 cm (26–37 in) in length, the species 1.78–2.45 m (5.8–8.0 ft) wingspan is on average the largest of any eagle. Although they often scavenge, the eagles may also hunt prey such as fish, birds and mammals.

Photograph by Yathin S Krishnappa

(via: Wikipedia)

Posted 1 month ago with 91 notes
rhamphotheca:

The yellow mongoose (Cynictis penicillata) is a small mammal, in the  Carnivoran family Herpestidae, averaging about 1 lb (1/2 kg) in weight and about 20 in (500 mm) in length. Found in southern Africa, it lives in flat areas ranging from semi-desert scrubland to grasslands. This carnivorous species lives in colonies of up to 20 individuals.
 Photograph: Yathin S Krishnappa
(via: Wikipedia)

rhamphotheca:

The yellow mongoose (Cynictis penicillata) is a small mammal, in the  Carnivoran family Herpestidae, averaging about 1 lb (1/2 kg) in weight and about 20 in (500 mm) in length. Found in southern Africa, it lives in flat areas ranging from semi-desert scrubland to grasslands. This carnivorous species lives in colonies of up to 20 individuals.

Photograph: Yathin S Krishnappa

(via: Wikipedia)

Tags: #mongoose #carnivore #mammals #animals #facts
Posted 1 month ago with 2 notes
rhamphotheca:

Bizarre, Prehistoric Ratfish Chomped Prey with Buzzsaw Jaws
by Brian Switek 
Helicoprion had saws for jaws. That’s really all there was to the 270 million year old ratfish’s dental cutlery. No upper teeth or anything else to slice against – just an ever-growing whorl of spiky teeth anchored to the lower jaw.
This new, definitive image of Helicoprion debuted last year thanks to the efforts of artist Ray Troll and a team of researchers led by Idaho State University paleontologist Leif Tapanila. A very special fossil – IMNH 37899 – preserved both the upper and lower jaws in a closed position, finally solving the mystery of what the ratfish’s head actually looked like. But determining the exact placement of that vexing spiral was just an initial step.
Paleontologists and artists had often supposed that Helicoprion had upper teeth to pierce slippery cephalopods and squirming fish, but the fossils Tapanila and colleagues examined showed that Helicoprion only had a buzzsaw embedded in the lower jaw. How did this long-lived and prolific genus of Permian fish eat with a saw for a jaw? …
(read more: Laelaps blog - National Geographic)
photograph by Brian Switek

rhamphotheca:

Bizarre, Prehistoric Ratfish Chomped Prey with Buzzsaw Jaws

by Brian Switek 

Helicoprion had saws for jaws. That’s really all there was to the 270 million year old ratfish’s dental cutlery. No upper teeth or anything else to slice against – just an ever-growing whorl of spiky teeth anchored to the lower jaw.

This new, definitive image of Helicoprion debuted last year thanks to the efforts of artist Ray Troll and a team of researchers led by Idaho State University paleontologist Leif Tapanila. A very special fossil – IMNH 37899 – preserved both the upper and lower jaws in a closed position, finally solving the mystery of what the ratfish’s head actually looked like. But determining the exact placement of that vexing spiral was just an initial step.

Paleontologists and artists had often supposed that Helicoprion had upper teeth to pierce slippery cephalopods and squirming fish, but the fossils Tapanila and colleagues examined showed that Helicoprion only had a buzzsaw embedded in the lower jaw. How did this long-lived and prolific genus of Permian fish eat with a saw for a jaw? …

(read more: Laelaps blog - National Geographic)

photograph by Brian Switek

iyacarolina:

Western Ribbon Snake because my friend asked for a black and gold snake and then I found this

iyacarolina:

Western Ribbon Snake because my friend asked for a black and gold snake and then I found this

Posted 1 month ago with 1 note